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Sociopaths and money

Australians lose $300 million to scams

con manAustralians lost $300 million to scams in 2016, up 47% from the previous year, according to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network.

More than 200,000 complaints were filed. The greatest losses, $59 million, came from investment scams, followed by $42 million in losses from romance scams.

One third of romance scams victims met the con artist through a social media platform.

Australians report losses of $300 million to scams in 2016, on SMH.com.au.

$300 million lost in online scams as they reach record levels in Australia, on AdelaideNow.com.au.

 

San Diego district attorney to present seminar on ‘Romance Scams and Love Fraud’

Romance scamWow a financial institution in the U.S. is finally taking romance scams seriously. On Wednesday, March 1, 2017, the San Diego County Credit Union will present a seminar called “Romance Scams and Love Fraud.”

The speaker is Paul Greenwood, San Diego County deputy district attorney. He will cover current scams, romance scams and ways to protect yourself.

If you’re in San Diego, California, you may want to stop by. It’s from 12-1 p.m. PT at the San Diego County Administration Center, 1600 Pacific Coast Highway. The event is free, and they’ll even serve you lunch!

Romance Scams Part 4: Fake dating apps and malware

Photo by Pat138241

Photo by Pat138241

Here’s yet another take on the dangers of online dating: The website Information Security Buzz reports that a number of fake dating apps have been created specifically to record your private data. And some dating sites have spread malware and malicious content.

So if you’re involved with online dating, not only do you need to worry about suitors using fake profiles to steal your heart and your money, but you also need to worry about your computer being infected with a nasty virus.

The risks associated with online dating just don’t quit.

The ins and outs of online love scams, on InformationSecurityBuzz.com.

Romance Scams Part 3: Malaysia busts four love scam syndicates and arrest 27 perps

Police from Malaysia and Singapore arrested 27 Internet love scammers in a joint operation on February 6-8. The criminals including 11 Nigerians and 14 women were members of four different crime syndicates.

These thieves of hearts and money cheated 108 people in neighboring countries out of $4.9 million.

All the syndicates were masterminded by Nigerians who entered Malaysia on student visas, according to David Chew, director of the Singapore police Commercial Affairs Department.


Romance Scams Part 2: U.S. victims lost more than $230 million online in 2016

Almost 15,000 complaints of romance scams or confidence fraud were reported to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center in 2016. Victims of these crimes lost more than $230 million.

In Texas alone, victims lost more than $16 million in romance scams.

Who is running these scams? In many cases, says FBI Special Agent Christine Beining, the perpetrators are organized crime gangs. Why? It’s an easy and lucrative crime. Criminals can often remain anonymous and beyond the reach of authorities. That’s why it’s on the rise.


Convicted con artist Patrick Giblin again pleads guilty to scamming women

Patrick M. Giblin

Patrick M. Giblin

Patrick Giblin, 52, formerly of Ventnor, New Jersey, yesterday pleaded guilty to scamming more than 10 women out of $15,000 to $40,000.

Giblin did this between January 2013 and December 2014 while on parole for previously scamming 132 women out of $320,241. Here’s Lovefraud’s original coverage of the story:

Patrick Giblin trolls phone dating lines, taking money from 132 women, on Lovefraud.com.

According to U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman, Giblin’s most recent adventures in phone scamming went like this:

7 Warning signs of a romance scam

boomers seniors onlineValentine’s Day is approaching. It’s a big day for romance and romance scammers.

What are warning signs that a potential partner that you met online is, in reality, a con artist? A British financial company called Keeping It Simple compiled a list that includes:

  1. Can’t meet or chat on the phone
  2. Inconsistencies in their story
  3. Repetition they can’t remember what they told to whom
  4. Wanting to chat via text/Whatsapp
  5. Sending emails to you with attachments to give your computer a virus
  6. Asking you a lot of questions, but not answering any of yours
  7. Their picture is too perfect movie star material

Woman fakes blindness for 15 years, collects nearly $400,000 in veteran’s benefits

Blind_Woman 2_200x247Back in 2001, Veronica Dale Hahn, 60, of Bonifay, Florida, told the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs that she was 100 percent blind in both eyes due to her military service. The VA believed her, and started paying her veteran’s disability benefits. In 15 years, she collected $394,800.85.

In the meantime, she obtained driver’s licenses in New Mexico, Alabama and Florida, with no vision restrictions. She drove her vehicle and worked full-time as a case manager at state correctional facilities.

Hahn pleaded guilty last week. When she is sentenced, she faces 10 years in prison.

Holmes County woman pleads guilty to fraudulently receiving veterans disability benefits, on Justice.gov.

One easy way to know if the soldier you met online is a scammer

Photo courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Photo courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Valentine’s Day is coming, and the U.S. Army expects a surge in scam reports.

Thousands of lonely women, looking for love online, meet members of the U.S. military. The men are handsome and rugged, they’re serving in harm’s way, and they’re also lonely. The men chat the women up, the women fall in love. The men want to pursue the relationship, but, they say, they need financial help to do it. Can the women send money?

Don’t do it! It’s a scam!

The U. S. Army Criminal Investigation Command says this:  DO NOT SEND MONEY TO PEOPLE YOU MEET ON THE INTERNET WHO CLAIM TO BE U.S. MILITARY.

Derek Alldred scams eight women of hundreds of thousands of dollars and skips sentencing hearing

Derek Alldred as a fake Navy SEAL

Derek Alldred as a fake Navy SEAL

Derek Alldred, a con artist who claimed to be everything from a doctor to a Navy SEAL to an investment banker for the Royal Bank of Scotland, has scammed at least eight women out of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

His most recent victim,  a woman from Arizona, met Alldred on a dating site. Alldred stole her jewelry and pawned it, then pleaded no contest to the crime.

Alldred pleaded no contest to theft charges and was supposed to be sentenced on December 13 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He never showed up for the hearing, and his victims fear that Alldred will just find more targets.

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