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Sociopaths as predators

Watch online: He Lied About Everything

Dr. Paolo Macchiarini.

I just watched the documentary He Lied About Everything, available online at InvestigationDiscovery.com. It’s the story of Benita Alexander, who as a NBC News producer, was seduced and scammed by Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, a world-famous surgeon.

I think Benita was incredibly brave in telling her story. While the good doctor was love bombing her, they both recorded plenty of videos. Benita, I’m sure, thought she was recording her fairytale romance. I don’t know what was in Macchiarini’s mind, because he obviously knew his whole involvement was a fake, so essentially what he recorded was evidence of his psychopathy.

My Bill Cosby experience: I definitely dodged a bullet

Entertainer Bill Cosby, 80, was convicted of sexually assaulting Andrea Constand last week. He drugged and assaulted her in 2004. Five other women testified that he did the same thing to them back in the ’80s — proving it was Cosby’s pattern of conduct.

The Philadelphia Inquirer has extensive coverage of the Cosby case. Click this link:

Bill Cosby trial

And here’s a story from USA Today:

A complete list of the 60 Bill Cosby accusers and their reactions to the guilty verdict

Have you tried exposing a sociopath online? Did it work?

A few weeks ago, the Philadelphia Inquirer published a story about a woman who says she went to sleep in the home of a male friend, and when she woke up realized she’d been raped. The woman didn’t go to the police — she believed it would be useless. So the took matters into her own hands. She told her story on Facebook, naming the man who assaulted her.

When she did, other women posted about similar experiences with the same man. For the perpetrator shamed via Facebook, there were consequences . He was a musician, and lost gigs. His landlord threw him out of his building.

Bruce McArthur of Toronto charged with killing five gay men; police search for more victims

Bruce McArthur (Facebook)

Toronto police had the apartment of Bruce McArthur under surveillance — he was suspected in the disappearance of several gay men. When they saw a male date arrive, they feared for the man’s safety and broke down the door. The man was found tied to a bed, shaken but unharmed.

At least five other men weren’t so lucky. McArthur, 66, a landscaper, has been charged with five counts of murder. Police found the dismembered skeletal remains of three men in large planters behind a home where McArthur stored landscaping equipment.

BBC: Confessions of a gaslighter

Authentic affection or a sociopath?If anyone still doubts that sociopaths engage in manipulation and deceit intentionally, this article from the BBC should help clear things up.

Cheating and manipulation: Confessions of a gaslighter.

The reporter interviewed a self-confessed “gaslighter,” — Greg, a 28-year-old Canadian lawyer. Greg claims that he suddenly became a “gasligher” at the age of 21. I doubt it. He’s likely a sociopath who has been manipulating people since he was a teenager, or earlier.

Still, the story is enlightening, because Greg details exactly what he does to convince women to doubt their own perceptions. Read it.

Link provided by a Lovefraud reader.

Fox News draws attention to romance scams

Finally, a major U.S. TV news channel is drawing attention to romance scams. Yesterday Fox News told the story of a nurse who thought she found love with a soldier. Actually what she found was a con artist who scammed her out of $50,000.

The soldier was Gabe Fanelli — but he didn’t scam the woman. His photos were stolen by a con artist. Fanelli gets 10-12 messages a week from women who say they’ve been scammed by him. He didn’t do it.

Here’s the scariest part of the story — the FBI says that love scams are among the fastest-growing crimes on the Internet.

Women aged 40-70: Be on the lookout for Internet predators like Tom Guida

Tom Guida, of Toms River, New Jersey, was accused of bigamy, but got away with it.

More than two years ago, Lovefraud posted about Tom Guida, age 55, of New Jersey. This guy is unbelievable. He finds women online, tells them he is a Ph.D. psychologist (lie), Special Operations military (lie), and suffering from brain cancer (lie).

He tells the women he loves them (lie) and then proposes marriage. He doesn’t tell them he is already married (truth). In fact, he’s a bigamist.

Here’s the Lovefraud story:

Tom Guida, aka Tom Gatto – fake psychologist, fake Special Forces, fake brain cancer patient – gets away with bigamy

10 things sociopaths want from you (besides money)

Photo by David Castillo Dominici

A Lovefraud reader asked the following question:

If the sociopath is not in it for money (he pays for everything with no access to my accounts) then what are other reasons to stay in a relationship if he doesn’t live with me nor do we share anything financially? Many of the posts I have read involve financial fraud.

If a sociopath has targeted you, it’s because you have something that he or she wants. Often it’s money, but not always. Here are 10 more things that the sociopath may want:

1. Sex

Marriage fraud: Immigrants profess love for U.S. citizens to get green cards

Elena Maria Lopez was a victim of marriage fraud — but she’s trying to do something about it.

Elena met a man from the Netherlands who was “romantic and charming.” (Sound familiar?) When they married, Elena was looking for a life partner. Her husband was looking for a green card.

My ex-husband was Australian, but had four American wives. And I’ve heard from many Lovefraud readers who eventually found out their foreign spouses only married them to get citizenship.

Elena sent me a link to a recent investigative report by KPRC Channel 2 in Houston, in which she told her story. Elena has also testified in Congress — trying to get lawmakers to understand that marriage fraud is a serious problem.

Devin Kelley, Texas church shooter, exhibited a pattern of psychopathic behavior, but no one saw the whole picture

Devin Kelley

The stories coming out of the massacre in the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, are horrific and heartbreaking.

The shooter, Devin Patrick Kelley, 26, walked into the church dressed in combat gear and killed congregants in the pews.  One survivor reported that Kelley became enraged that children were scared, and shot them multiple times.

Kelley executed 26 people that day, including nine children. Eight members of one extended family were killed. Twenty more churchgoers were injured.

Authorities release IDs of Texas church victims, on ABCnews.go.com

Afterwards, of course, everyone is asking, “How did this happen?” “Were there any warning signs?”

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